Well-selected Collection

 TOKYO PHOTOGRAPHIC ART MUSEUM

goEDO-TOKYO MUSEUM  goMUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART TOKYO  Back Numbers

  • Portrait of Nonomura Tadazane
    Charles. D. Fredricks
    1860
    Daguerreotype

    In 1860, Nonomura Tadazane traveled to America in the retinue of Deputy Envoy Muragaki Awajinokami Norimasa for the exchange of documents related to the Treaty of Amity and Commerce between the United States and Japan, which was concluded in Ansei 5 (1858).

  • Kojima Ryua and his family
    Kojima Ryua
    c. 1873
    Ambrotype

    Kojima Ryua (1820-1882) studied and conducted research on chemistry and photography with his uncle Iinuma Yokusai, a practitioner of Western medicine, in Ogaki, a castle town in what is now Gifu Prefecture. Around Meiji 3 (1870) he opened the region’s first photography studio in the town of Gifu, his hometown. This print is an experimental composite photograph. Other experimental works thought to date from before the opening of his studio include a self-portrait, Portrait of Kojima Ryua, and a photograph of his daughter, Portrait of Kojima Towo.

  • Portrait of Kojima Ryua
    Kojima Ryua
    c. 1865-68
    Ambrotype

    Kojima Ryua (1820-1882) studied and conducted research on chemistry and photography with his uncle Iinuma Yokusai, a practitioner of Western medicine, in Ogaki, a castle town in what is now Gifu Prefecture. Around Meiji 3 (1870) he opened the region’s first photography studio in the town Gifu, his hometown. This self-portrait and a photograph of his daughter, Portrait of Kojima Towo, are thought to be experimental works dating from before the opening of his studio.

  • Portrait of Kojima Towo
    Kojima Ryua
    c. 1865-68
    Ambrotype

    Kojima Ryua (1820-1882) studied and conducted research on chemistry and photography with his uncle Iinuma Yokusai, a practitioner of Western medicine, in Ogaki, a castle town in what is now Gifu Prefecture. Around Meiji 3 (1870) he opened the region’s first photography studio in the town of Gifu, his hometown. This photograph of his daughter, and a self-portrait, Portrait of Kojima Ryua, are thought to be experimental works dating from before the opening of his studio.

  • Portrait of Tada Yoshiakira
    Hori Yohee
    1868
    Ambrotype

    Tada Yoshiakira (1845-1903) was a samurai from the Saga domain (now Saga Prefecture and part of Nagasaki Prefecture). He fought in the Boshin War (1868-69), the civil war between the supporters of the Tokugawa shogunate and those wishing to restore rule to the emperor that ended in the Meiji Restoration.A story associated with this photograph relates that although he was ordered to fight in the Boshin War, he went back to his home domain before joining the battle, because he was his family’s heir. We know from the distinctive carpet that this photograph was taken by Kyoto photographer Hori Yohee. The size of the sword at his hip, an extra-long type normally carried across the back, makes Tada look short. He is said, however, to have been 180 centimeters tall.

  • (Portrait of Tokudaiji Kimihiro and a man)
    Esaki Reiji
    1876
    Ambrotype

    Born and raised in Gifu Prefecture, Esaki Reiji (1845-1910) taught himself photography by reading Yanagawa Shunsan’s Shashin Kagami Zusetsu (Illustrated Guide to Photography). In 1871, he moved to Tokyo, where he continued his studies with Shimooka Renjo and other photographers before opening his own studio in Asakusa Koen in 1873. In 1883, he used imported gelatin plates to photograph speedboat races and torpedo explosions, the first instantaneous photography in Japan. He called himself the fast-shooter photographer. In 1898, he was elected to the Tokyo City Council and later was appointed president of the company operating the Asakusa Ryounkaku, Japan’s first skyscraper. This photograph from 1874 is believed to have been created shortly after Esaki Reiji opened his studio and are rare his use of the ambrotype.

  • Documentary Photographs of the Sino-Japanese War
    Kashima Seibee
    c. 1894-95
    Albumen print

    Kashima Seibee (1866-1924) was known as the billionaire photographer. With a huge sake wholesaling fortune to draw on, he was able to afford such extravagances as the massive lighting required to shoot in the Kabuki theater (the Kabukiza) and making and donating a huge print of Mt. Fuji to the Imperial Household Agency. In his old age, however, his adoptive family broke off ties with him, and he died in poverty.

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