Well-selected Collection

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  • Early summer showers at Sanno shrine@Series: Twelve scenes of Tokyo
    Kawase Hasui

    A woman, an infant on her back, is strolling within the precincts of the Hie Shrine (Chiyoda Ward, Tokyo). The rain and the cherry trees covered with fresh green leaves communicate the mood of early summer.

    Twelve scenes of Tokyo
    Early summer showers at Sanno shrine
    1919
    Kawase Hasui
    Kawase Hasuii1883|1957j
    Hasui was born in Rogetsu-cho, Shiba-ku, Tokyo (present-day Shinbashi 5-chome, Minato-ku), and his uncle was Kanagaki Robun, one of the most popular fiction-writers of Meiji Japan. According to his wifefs memoir, he was a calm and quiet man. He became a student of Kaburaki Kiyokata at the age of 27, and was given the pseudonym gHasui,h which he continued to use during his lifetime.
    In 1918, he begins his career as a woodblock print artist under the publisher Watanabe Shozaburo, who advocated the production of gNew Prints.h gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) were creative and at the same time artistically sophisticated form of woodblock prints, which were made under the cooperative effort of the publisher, artist, carver, and printer. Also working at the Watanabe print shop were Ito Shinsui and others who worked on the pictures of beautiful women (bijinga), Natori Shunsen and Yamamura Koka who worked on the prints depicting actors (yasusha-e), and Ohara Koson who produced the pictures of flowers and birds (kacho-ga). Hasui was in charge of the landscape prints, and he became the most productive among the gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) artists, with more than six hundred works completed during his lifetime.
    On his experience of depicting Tokyo, Hasui speaks: gSince I have lived here ever since I was born, from the moment I decide to work on a specific place, I begin to feel a strange power that tells me that the place belongs to me, allowing me to do the sketches according to my own will.h

  • Komagata embankment @Series: Twelve scenes of Tokyo
    Kawase Hasui

    This print is said to have been based on a sketch made on a summer afternoon in front of a bamboo dealerfs stock along the Komagata river bank. According to Hasui, this work has "a very summery feel."

    Twelve scenes of Tokyo
    Komagata embankment
    1919
    Kawase Hasui
    Kawase Hasuii1883|1957)
    Hasui was born in Rogetsu-cho, Shiba-ku, Tokyo (present-day Shinbashi 5-chome, Minato-ku), and his uncle was Kanagaki Robun, one of the most popular fiction-writers of Meiji Japan. According to his wifefs memoir, he was a calm and quiet man. He became a student of Kaburaki Kiyokata at the age of 27, and was given the pseudonym gHasui,h which he continued to use during his lifetime.
    In 1918, he begins his career as a woodblock print artist under the publisher Watanabe Shozaburo, who advocated the production of gNew Prints.h gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) were creative and at the same time artistically sophisticated form of woodblock prints, which were made under the cooperative effort of the publisher, artist, carver, and printer. Also working at the Watanabe print shop were Ito Shinsui and others who worked on the pictures of beautiful women (bijinga), Natori Shunsen and Yamamura Koka who worked on the prints depicting actors (yasusha-e), and Ohara Koson who produced the pictures of flowers and birds (kacho-ga). Hasui was in charge of the landscape prints, and he became the most productive among the gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) artists, with more than six hundred works completed during his lifetime.
    On his experience of depicting Tokyo, Hasui speaks: gSince I have lived here ever since I was born, from the moment I decide to work on a specific place, I begin to feel a strange power that tells me that the place belongs to me, allowing me to do the sketches according to my own will.h

  • Kami-no-hashi bridge,Fukagawa @Series: Twelve scenes of Tokyo
    Kawase Hasui

    "This area somehow recalls how it looked when Hokusai created his Scene of Both Sides of the Sumida River," Hasui said of this print. Its composition, with a view of a distant scene under the wooden bridge, is also reminiscent of Hokusai's Mannen Bridge at Fukagawa, from his Thirty-six Views of Mt. Fuji.

    Twelve scenes of Tokyo
    Kami-no-hashi bridge,Fukagawa @
    1920
    Kawase Hasui
    Kawase Hasuii1883|1957j
    Hasui was born in Rogetsu-cho, Shiba-ku, Tokyo (present-day Shinbashi 5-chome, Minato-ku), and his uncle was Kanagaki Robun, one of the most popular fiction-writers of Meiji Japan. According to his wifefs memoir, he was a calm and quiet man. He became a student of Kaburaki Kiyokata at the age of 27, and was given the pseudonym gHasui,h which he continued to use during his lifetime.
    In 1918, he begins his career as a woodblock print artist under the publisher Watanabe Shozaburo, who advocated the production of gNew Prints.h gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) were creative and at the same time artistically sophisticated form of woodblock prints, which were made under the cooperative effort of the publisher, artist, carver, and printer. Also working at the Watanabe print shop were Ito Shinsui and others who worked on the pictures of beautiful women (bijinga), Natori Shunsen and Yamamura Koka who worked on the prints depicting actors (yasusha-e), and Ohara Koson who produced the pictures of flowers and birds (kacho-ga). Hasui was in charge of the landscape prints, and he became the most productive among the gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) artists, with more than six hundred works completed during his lifetime.
    On his experience of depicting Tokyo, Hasui speaks: gSince I have lived here ever since I was born, from the moment I decide to work on a specific place, I begin to feel a strange power that tells me that the place belongs to me, allowing me to do the sketches according to my own will.h

  • Sunset glow in Yanaka Series: Twelve scenes of Tokyo
    Kawase Hasui

    The five-storied pagoda at Kannoji, in Yanaka, lit by the setting sun. The pagoda burned down in July, 1957.

    Twelve scenes of Tokyo
    Kami-no-hashi bridge,Fukagawa @
    1921
    Kawase Hasui
    Kawase Hasuii1883|1957j
    Hasui was born in Rogetsu-cho, Shiba-ku, Tokyo (present-day Shinbashi 5-chome, Minato-ku), and his uncle was Kanagaki Robun, one of the most popular fiction-writers of Meiji Japan. According to his wifefs memoir, he was a calm and quiet man. He became a student of Kaburaki Kiyokata at the age of 27, and was given the pseudonym gHasui,h which he continued to use during his lifetime.
    In 1918, he begins his career as a woodblock print artist under the publisher Watanabe Shozaburo, who advocated the production of gNew Prints.h gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) were creative and at the same time artistically sophisticated form of woodblock prints, which were made under the cooperative effort of the publisher, artist, carver, and printer. Also working at the Watanabe print shop were Ito Shinsui and others who worked on the pictures of beautiful women (bijinga), Natori Shunsen and Yamamura Koka who worked on the prints depicting actors (yasusha-e), and Ohara Koson who produced the pictures of flowers and birds (kacho-ga). Hasui was in charge of the landscape prints, and he became the most productive among the gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) artists, with more than six hundred works completed during his lifetime.
    On his experience of depicting Tokyo, Hasui speaks: gSince I have lived here ever since I was born, from the moment I decide to work on a specific place, I begin to feel a strange power that tells me that the place belongs to me, allowing me to do the sketches according to my own will.h

  • Akashi-cho after the rain Series: Twenty views of Tokyo@ Drawing
    Kawase Hasui

    The original painting on which After the Rain at Akashi, from the Twenty Views of Tokyo, was based. It includes a figure of a woman in kimono that is not in the finished print.

    Twenty views of Tokyo
    Akashi-cho after the rain @
    1928
    Kawase Hasui
    Kawase Hasuii1883|1957j
    Hasui was born in Rogetsu-cho, Shiba-ku, Tokyo (present-day Shinbashi 5-chome, Minato-ku), and his uncle was Kanagaki Robun, one of the most popular fiction-writers of Meiji Japan. According to his wifefs memoir, he was a calm and quiet man. He became a student of Kaburaki Kiyokata at the age of 27, and was given the pseudonym gHasui,h which he continued to use during his lifetime.
    In 1918, he begins his career as a woodblock print artist under the publisher Watanabe Shozaburo, who advocated the production of gNew Prints.h gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) were creative and at the same time artistically sophisticated form of woodblock prints, which were made under the cooperative effort of the publisher, artist, carver, and printer. Also working at the Watanabe print shop were Ito Shinsui and others who worked on the pictures of beautiful women (bijinga), Natori Shunsen and Yamamura Koka who worked on the prints depicting actors (yasusha-e), and Ohara Koson who produced the pictures of flowers and birds (kacho-ga). Hasui was in charge of the landscape prints, and he became the most productive among the gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) artists, with more than six hundred works completed during his lifetime.
    On his experience of depicting Tokyo, Hasui speaks: gSince I have lived here ever since I was born, from the moment I decide to work on a specific place, I begin to feel a strange power that tells me that the place belongs to me, allowing me to do the sketches according to my own will.h

  • Moon at Magome Series: Twenty views of Tokyo
    Kawase Hasui

    Magome (Ota Ward, Tokyo) is an area in Kawase Hasui lived and that was most familiar to him. Looking back on his life, Hasui said that the years in which he lived in Magome (from about 1930 until 1944) was the most enjoyable part of his life. The pine that is the subject of this print no longer exists.

    Twenty views of Tokyo
    Moon at Magome @
    1930
    Kawase Hasui
    Kawase Hasuii1883|1957j
    Hasui was born in Rogetsu-cho, Shiba-ku, Tokyo (present-day Shinbashi 5-chome, Minato-ku), and his uncle was Kanagaki Robun, one of the most popular fiction-writers of Meiji Japan. According to his wifefs memoir, he was a calm and quiet man. He became a student of Kaburaki Kiyokata at the age of 27, and was given the pseudonym gHasui,h which he continued to use during his lifetime.
    In 1918, he begins his career as a woodblock print artist under the publisher Watanabe Shozaburo, who advocated the production of gNew Prints.h gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) were creative and at the same time artistically sophisticated form of woodblock prints, which were made under the cooperative effort of the publisher, artist, carver, and printer. Also working at the Watanabe print shop were Ito Shinsui and others who worked on the pictures of beautiful women (bijinga), Natori Shunsen and Yamamura Koka who worked on the prints depicting actors (yasusha-e), and Ohara Koson who produced the pictures of flowers and birds (kacho-ga). Hasui was in charge of the landscape prints, and he became the most productive among the gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) artists, with more than six hundred works completed during his lifetime.
    On his experience of depicting Tokyo, Hasui speaks: gSince I have lived here ever since I was born, from the moment I decide to work on a specific place, I begin to feel a strange power that tells me that the place belongs to me, allowing me to do the sketches according to my own will.h

  • Kiyosu Bridge
    Kawase Hasui

    Kiyosu Bridge was built over the Sumida River in 1928 as part of the reconstruction after the Great Kanto Earthquake in 1923. The site had originally been the Nakasu ferry crossing; the boat laden with freight passing under the bridge recalls something of the old days.

    Kiyosu Bridge @
    1931
    Kawase Hasui
    Kawase Hasuii1883|1957j
    Hasui was born in Rogetsu-cho, Shiba-ku, Tokyo (present-day Shinbashi 5-chome, Minato-ku), and his uncle was Kanagaki Robun, one of the most popular fiction-writers of Meiji Japan. According to his wifefs memoir, he was a calm and quiet man. He became a student of Kaburaki Kiyokata at the age of 27, and was given the pseudonym gHasui,h which he continued to use during his lifetime.
    In 1918, he begins his career as a woodblock print artist under the publisher Watanabe Shozaburo, who advocated the production of gNew Prints.h gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) were creative and at the same time artistically sophisticated form of woodblock prints, which were made under the cooperative effort of the publisher, artist, carver, and printer. Also working at the Watanabe print shop were Ito Shinsui and others who worked on the pictures of beautiful women (bijinga), Natori Shunsen and Yamamura Koka who worked on the prints depicting actors (yasusha-e), and Ohara Koson who produced the pictures of flowers and birds (kacho-ga). Hasui was in charge of the landscape prints, and he became the most productive among the gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) artists, with more than six hundred works completed during his lifetime.
    On his experience of depicting Tokyo, Hasui speaks: gSince I have lived here ever since I was born, from the moment I decide to work on a specific place, I begin to feel a strange power that tells me that the place belongs to me, allowing me to do the sketches according to my own will.h

  • Dawn at the Nihonbashi-Bridge
    Kawase Hasui

    This work, a radiant depiction of Nihonbashi, is thought to been created when a plan was underway for a collection of prints on the Tokaido, of which Nihonbashi was the starting point. Hasui did not favor treating famous places and historic sites directly; in that sense, this is a very unusual work.

    Dawn at the Nihonbashi-Bridge @
    1940
    Kawase Hasui
    Kawase Hasuii1883|1957)
    Hasui was born in Rogetsu-cho, Shiba-ku, Tokyo (present-day Shinbashi 5-chome, Minato-ku), and his uncle was Kanagaki Robun, one of the most popular fiction-writers of Meiji Japan. According to his wifefs memoir, he was a calm and quiet man. He became a student of Kaburaki Kiyokata at the age of 27, and was given the pseudonym gHasui,h which he continued to use during his lifetime.
    In 1918, he begins his career as a woodblock print artist under the publisher Watanabe Shozaburo, who advocated the production of gNew Prints.h gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) were creative and at the same time artistically sophisticated form of woodblock prints, which were made under the cooperative effort of the publisher, artist, carver, and printer. Also working at the Watanabe print shop were Ito Shinsui and others who worked on the pictures of beautiful women (bijinga), Natori Shunsen and Yamamura Koka who worked on the prints depicting actors (yasusha-e), and Ohara Koson who produced the pictures of flowers and birds (kacho-ga). Hasui was in charge of the landscape prints, and he became the most productive among the gNew Printsh (shin-hanga) artists, with more than six hundred works completed during his lifetime.
    On his experience of depicting Tokyo, Hasui speaks: gSince I have lived here ever since I was born, from the moment I decide to work on a specific place, I begin to feel a strange power that tells me that the place belongs to me, allowing me to do the sketches according to my own will.h

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