Well-selected Collection

 EDO-TOKYO MUSEUM

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  • Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: The Great Wave off the Coast of Kanagawa
    Painted by Hokusai renamed Iitsu

    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji
    This is Hokusaifs most famous landscape woodblock series. It actually comprises forty-six prints, not merely thirty-six views as the title suggests. The works were not published together, but in several groups over some years. At the end of the book Shohonjitate by a popular writer of the age, Ryutei Tanehiko, there is an advertisement titled gThe Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji painted by former Hokusai aka Father Iitsu, One Printed in Indigo,h followed by description that he will paint one scene per picture and will publish them serially.

    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: The Great Wave off the Coast of Kanagawa
    Painted by Hokusai renamed Iitsu
    Published by Nishimuraya Yohachi
    Circa 1831
    The painter drew a tremendous wave with seamen hanging tightly to a boat racked by the wave. In the background, Mount Fuji is dwarfed by the wave. This is the most highly evaluated work of Hokusai, in and out of Japan. It inspired Debussy to compose his masterpiece La Mer and Van Gogh spoke highly of the print in a letter to his brother, Theo.

  • Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Shower Below the Summit
    Painted by Hokusai renamed Iitsu
    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji
    This is Hokusaifs most famous landscape woodblock series. It actually comprises forty-six prints, not merely thirty-six views as the title suggests. The works were not published together, but in several groups over some years. At the end of the book Shohonjitate by a popular writer of the age, Ryutei Tanehiko, there is an advertisement titled gThe Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji painted by former Hokusai aka Father Iitsu, One Printed in Indigo,h followed by description that he will paint one scene per picture and will publish them serially.

    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Shower Below the Summit
    Painted by Hokusai renamed Iitsu
    Published by Nishimuraya Yohachi
    Circa 1831
    Hokusai used the word shiro ame (white rain) for shower. Shiro ame falls from a bright sky. The peak of Mount Fuji is clear, but at the mountain's foot lightning strikes with clouds bringing the rain.

  • Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Under the Fukagawa Mannen Bridge
    Painted by Hokusai renamed Iitsu
    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji
    This is Hokusaifs most famous landscape woodblock series. It actually comprises forty-six prints, not merely thirty-six views as the title suggests. The works were not published together, but in several groups over some years. At the end of the book Shohonjitate by a popular writer of the age, Ryutei Tanehiko, there is an advertisement titled gThe Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji painted by former Hokusai aka Father Iitsu, One Printed in Indigo,h followed by description that he will paint one scene per picture and will publish them serially.

    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Under the Fukagawa Mannen Bridge
    Painted by Hokusai renamed Iitsu
    Published by Nishimuraya Yohachi
    Circa 1831
    Mannen Bridge stood where Onagi River and Sumida River meet. The painter is said to have gotten the idea for this picture's composition after looking at Mount Fuji from underneath the bridge from gUnder the Bridgeh in The Hundred Fuji by Kawamura Minsetsu.

  • Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Fujimi-ga-hara in Owari Province
    Painted by Hokusai renamed Iitsu
    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji
    This is Hokusaifs most famous landscape woodblock series. It actually comprises forty-six prints, not merely thirty-six views as the title suggests. The works were not published together, but in several groups over some years. At the end of the book Shohonjitate by a popular writer of the age, Ryutei Tanehiko, there is an advertisement titled gThe Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji painted by former Hokusai aka Father Iitsu, One Printed in Indigo,h followed by description that he will paint one scene per picture and will publish them serially.

    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Fujimi-ga-hara in Owari Province
    Painted by Hokusai renamed Iitsu
    Published by Nishimuraya Yohachi
    Circa 1831
    Fujimi-ga-hara in Owari Province is Fujimi Town, Nagoya, today. A small, triangular Fuji is shown through an enormous barrel.

  • Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Sunset View across Ry?goku-bashi Bridge
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji
    This is Hokusaifs most famous landscape woodblock series. It actually comprises forty-six prints, not merely thirty-six views as the title suggests. The works were not published together, but in several groups over some years. At the end of the book Shohonjitate by a popular writer of the age, Ryutei Tanehiko, there is an advertisement titled gThe Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji painted by former Hokusai aka Father Iitsu, One Printed in Indigo,h followed by description that he will paint one scene per picture and will publish them serially.

    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Sunset View across Ry?goku-bashi Bridge
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Published by Nishimuraya Yohachi
    Circa 1831
    This is a view of Ryogoku Bridge from upstream in the Sumida River. The boat is the Oumaya ferry. The sun is about to set in the direction of Mount Fuji.

  • Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Tatekawa at Honjo
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji
    This is Hokusaifs most famous landscape woodblock series. It actually comprises forty-six prints, not merely thirty-six views as the title suggests. The works were not published together, but in several groups over some years. At the end of the book Shohonjitate by a popular writer of the age, Ryutei Tanehiko, there is an advertisement titled gThe Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji painted by former Hokusai aka Father Iitsu, One Printed in Indigo,h followed by description that he will paint one scene per picture and will publish them serially.

    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Tatekawa at Honjo
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Published by Nishimuraya Yohachi
    Circa 1831
    Workers at a lumberyard in Tatekawa, Honjo are too busy to notice Mount Fuji through the standing boards. The wholesaler's sign reads gNishimura Warehouseh and on the lumber is written gNew Boards Thirty Six Fuji Purchased,h subtly advertising the print series. The composition catches the moment wood is thrown between the men.

  • Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Water Wheel at Onden
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji
    This is Hokusaifs most famous landscape woodblock series. It actually comprises forty-six prints, not merely thirty-six views as the title suggests. The works were not published together, but in several groups over some years. At the end of the book Shohonjitate by a popular writer of the age, Ryutei Tanehiko, there is an advertisement titled gThe Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji painted by former Hokusai aka Father Iitsu, One Printed in Indigo,h followed by description that he will paint one scene per picture and will publish them serially.

    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Water Wheel at Onden
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Published by Nishimuraya Yohachi
    Circa 1831
    Onden Village is the area where Harajuku and Omotesando are now. The Onden River, now called the Shibuya River, runs between the water wheel and Mount Fuji. Hokusai shows the spinning water wheel and villagers using the water from the flour mill.

  • Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Nihonbashi Bridge at Edo
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji
    This is Hokusaifs most famous landscape woodblock series. It actually comprises forty-six prints, not merely thirty-six views as the title suggests. The works were not published together, but in several groups over some years. At the end of the book Shohonjitate by a popular writer of the age, Ryutei Tanehiko, there is an advertisement titled gThe Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji painted by former Hokusai aka Father Iitsu, One Printed in Indigo,h followed by description that he will paint one scene per picture and will publish them serially.

    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Nihonbashi Bridge at Edo
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Published by Nishimuraya Yohachi
    Circa 1831
    Edo Castle and Mount Fuji are painted as a view from Nihonbashi Bridge. Nihonbashi was the center of Edo City. Hokusai intentionally drew only part of the bridge; a giboshi ornament and the movement of crowds and cargo on the bridge express this area symbolically.

  • Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: View of the Mitsui Shop, Sugura Street, in Edo
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji
    This is Hokusaifs most famous landscape woodblock series. It actually comprises forty-six prints, not merely thirty-six views as the title suggests. The works were not published together, but in several groups over some years. At the end of the book Shohonjitate by a popular writer of the age, Ryutei Tanehiko, there is an advertisement titled gThe Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji painted by former Hokusai aka Father Iitsu, One Printed in Indigo,h followed by description that he will paint one scene per picture and will publish them serially.

    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: View of the Mitsui Shop, Sugura Street, in Edo
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Published by Nishimuraya Yohachi
    Circa 1831
    A view of Mount Fuji from Echigoya Store (the present day Mitsukoshi) in Nihonbashi. The roof tiles are being renovated. We see kites in the sky, a New Year tradition in Edo, so this scene might be during early January. On the kite in the middle is the Chinese character ju meaning ghappy and long lifeh. This symbolizes celebrating the New Year and at the same time shows gratitude to Ei-ju-do owned by Nishimura Yohachi, the publisher of Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji.

  • Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Turban-shell Hall of the Five-Hundred-Rakan
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji
    This is Hokusaifs most famous landscape woodblock series. It actually comprises forty-six prints, not merely thirty-six views as the title suggests. The works were not published together, but in several groups over some years. At the end of the book Shohonjitate by a popular writer of the age, Ryutei Tanehiko, there is an advertisement titled gThe Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji painted by former Hokusai aka Father Iitsu, One Printed in Indigo,h followed by description that he will paint one scene per picture and will publish them serially.

    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Turban-shell Hall of the Five-Hundred-Rakan
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Published by Nishimuraya Yohachi
    Circa 1831
    The Five-Hundred-Rakan Temple in Honjo Tatekawa Istutsume (now Oshima 3-chome, Koto Ward) was well known as one of the landmarks of Edo. Turban-shell Hall, Sazai-do, was a three-storied pagoda in the temple grounds. The view of Edo City from the top of the pagoda was so beautiful that people enjoyed visiting for the view as well as for worshiping Buddha.

  • Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji: Fuji from Gotenyanma Hill at Shinagawa on the Tokaido
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji
    This is Hokusaifs most famous landscape woodblock series. It actually comprises forty-six prints, not merely thirty-six views as the title suggests. The works were not published together, but in several groups over some years. At the end of the book Shohonjitate by a popular writer of the age, Ryutei Tanehiko, there is an advertisement titled gThe Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji painted by former Hokusai aka Father Iitsu, One Printed in Indigo,h followed by description that he will paint one scene per picture and will publish them serially.

    Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji: Fuji from Gotenyanma Hill at Shinagawa on the Tokaido
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Published by Nishimuraya Yohachi
    Circa 1831
    The cherry blossoms of Gotenyama were transplanted from Yoshino, a famous cherry blossom mountain in Nara, in the Kanmon era (1661-1673) and then became popular in the Kyoho era (1716`1736) attracting people in the spring as much as Ueno and Asuka Hill had. Hiroshige also depicted Gotenyama in his prints, but here Hokusai draws the cherry trees as if they reach the sky.

  • Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Fine Weather
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji
    This is Hokusaifs most famous landscape woodblock series. It actually comprises forty-six prints, not merely thirty-six views as the title suggests. The works were not published together, but in several groups over some years. At the end of the book Shohonjitate by a popular writer of the age, Ryutei Tanehiko, there is an advertisement titled gThe Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji painted by former Hokusai aka Father Iitsu, One Printed in Indigo,h followed by description that he will paint one scene per picture and will publish them serially.

    Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji: Fine Weather
    Painted by former Hokusai Iitsu
    Published by Nishimuraya Yohachi
    Circa 1831
    Although this is one of the most famous pieces in the Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji series, we still do not know where Hokusai had his view of the mountain. This work is commonly known as gThe Red Fujih and it catches the very moment when Mount Fuji turned crimson in the faint remains of an early morning glow.

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